Religion

This Nov. 13, 2016 photo shows performers in a Diwali celebration at Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim, Calif. Diwali is a festival of lights celebrated by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains in India and other countries, but the holiday is becoming better known in the U.S. with more public celebrations here. The Diwali celebration at Disneyland Resort, which includes performances of traditional Indian dances and a Bollywood dance party for guests, is part of a festival of holidays at the theme park reflecting cultural traditions from around the world. The Disney festival begins Nov. 10 this year and runs through Jan. 7. (Scott Brinegar/Disneyland Resort via AP)
September 26, 2017 - 8:15 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The holiday of Diwali is starting to light up mainstream America. Diwali, a festival of lights celebrated by Hindus, Sikhs, Jains and others in India and other countries, has long been observed in immigrant communities around the U.S. But now public celebrations are starting to pop...
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Rohingya Muslim children, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, wait to receive aid during a distribution near Balukhali refugee camp, Bangladesh, Monday, Sept. 25, 2017. More than 400,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when deadly attacks by a Rohingya insurgent group on police posts prompted Myanmar's military to launch "clearance operations" in Rakhine state. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
September 26, 2017 - 7:38 am
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Bangladesh is planning to build separate shelters for 6,000 Rohingya Muslim children who entered the country without parents to escape violence in neighboring Myanmar, a government official said Tuesday. Children make up about 60 percent of the more than 420,000 Rohingya...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2017, file photo a protester holds a sign at San Francisco International Airport during a demonstration to denounce President Donald Trump's executive order that bars citizens of seven predominantly Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. The Trump administration announced new restrictions after spending months hashing out the details determined to avoid a repeat of the chaos of Trump’s first travel ban. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
September 26, 2017 - 4:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration says new measures to restrict immigration are required to keep the nation safe. President Donald Trump has signed a measure imposing new restrictions on travelers from a handful of countries. And that includes five that were covered by his travel ban that...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2017, file photo a protester holds a sign at San Francisco International Airport during a demonstration to denounce President Donald Trump's executive order that bars citizens of seven predominantly Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. The Trump administration announced new restrictions after spending months hashing out the details determined to avoid a repeat of the chaos of Trump’s first travel ban. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
September 26, 2017 - 4:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration says new measures to restrict immigration are required to keep the nation safe. President Donald Trump has signed a measure imposing new restrictions on travelers from a handful of countries. And that includes five that were covered by his travel ban that...
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In this Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017 photo released by the Saudi Culture and Information Ministry, the image of King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are projected on the Kingdom Tower during National Day ceremonies in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A new 62-page report by Human Rights Watch finds that despite Saudi Arabia's recent efforts toward reform, some state-backed clerics continue to "incite hatred and discrimination against religious minorities" while text books stigmatize minorities, particularly Muslim Shiites. (Saudi Culture and Information Ministry via AP)
September 26, 2017 - 3:30 am
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The Saudi government continues to tolerate hate speech by some clerics against minority groups while public school textbooks in the kingdom still include language that discriminates against other forms of worship, a new study by Human Rights Watch said Tuesday...
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In this Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017 photo released by the Saudi Culture and Information Ministry, the image of King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are projected on the Kingdom Tower during National Day ceremonies in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A new 62-page report by Human Rights Watch finds that despite Saudi Arabia's recent efforts toward reform, some state-backed clerics continue to "incite hatred and discrimination against religious minorities" while text books stigmatize minorities, particularly Muslim Shiites. (Saudi Culture and Information Ministry via AP)
September 26, 2017 - 3:30 am
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The Saudi government continues to tolerate hate speech by some clerics against minority groups while public school textbooks in the kingdom still include language that discriminates against other forms of worship, a new study by Human Rights Watch said Tuesday...
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