Medical research

In this March 17, 2017, photo, Myron Rolle opens his "Match Day" letter that shows where he will continue his medical education and residency, in Tallahassee, Fla. Rolle was an All-American defensive back at Florida State but his bigger accomplishments have come off the field. He was a Rhodes Scholar and last month graduated from Florida State's College of Medicine. Rolle begins his neurosurgery residency next month at Harvard Medical School. (Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via AP)
June 25, 2017 - 10:22 am
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Myron Rolle has accomplished many things on and off the field. His biggest ones, though, might still be coming up. Rolle's dream of becoming a doctor came to fruition on May 20 when he graduated from Florida State's College of Medicine. The former All-American safety and...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, April 4, 2017, an unidentified man walks past the Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural Center in Tuskegee, Ala. The Trump administration is opposing a bid to use unclaimed money from a legal settlement to fund the museum, which includes exhibits honoring victims of the government's infamous Tuskegee syphilis study. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)
June 24, 2017 - 10:14 am
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The Trump administration opposes a bid to use unclaimed money from a legal settlement over the government's infamous Tuskegee syphilis study to fund a museum honoring victims of the research project. The Justice Department argued in court documents recently that providing...
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June 24, 2017 - 8:29 am
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The Trump administration is opposing a bid to use unclaimed money from a court settlement to fund a museum honoring victims of the infamous Tuskegee syphilis study. Government lawyers have filed papers saying money remaining from the 1975 agreement shouldn't go to the...
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In this Thursday, June 15, 2017, photo, people walk inside the Oculus, the new transit station at the World Trade Center in New York. Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting 10,000 New Yorkers early next year for a study so sweeping it’s called “The Human Project.” They’ll be asked to share a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 years. The idea is to channel different data streams into a river of insight on health, aging, education and many other aspects of human life. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
June 19, 2017 - 9:22 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Wanted: 10,000 New Yorkers interested in advancing science by sharing a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 years. Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting participants from across the...
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FILE - In this April 23, 2014 file photo, a man smokes an electronic cigarette in Chicago. A large government survey released Thursday, June 15, 2017, suggests the number of U.S. high school and middle school students using electronic cigarettes fell to 2.2 million last year, from 3 million the year before. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)
June 15, 2017 - 2:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Teen vaping, which has been skyrocketing, fell dramatically last year in the United States. A government survey released Thursday suggests the number of high school and middle school students using electronic cigarettes fell to 2.2 million last year, from 3 million the year before...
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This June 6, 2017, photo, Utah resident Doug Rice administers the CBD oil Haleigh's Hope, a cannabis compound used by his daughter Ashley at their home in West Jordan, Utah. Utah lawmakers balked again this year at joining more than half of all U.S. states and passing a broad medical marijuana law. Rice says Utah's approach means his daughter, who has a genetic condition, is missing out on the one drug that eliminates her frequent seizures. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
June 14, 2017 - 7:25 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah lawmakers balked again this year at joining more than half of all U.S. states and passing a broad medical marijuana law. Instead, they gave state colleges and other institutions a green light to study the medical impacts of the drug with the hope of having comprehensive...
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In this photo taken March 29, 2017, Dr. David Maloney of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is greeted by patient Ken Shefveland, whose lymphoma was successfully treated with CAR-T cell therapy. Immune therapy is the hottest trend in cancer care and its next frontier is creating "living drugs" that grow inside the body into an army that seeks and destroys tumors. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
June 12, 2017 - 9:15 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Ken Shefveland's body was swollen with cancer, treatment after treatment failing until doctors gambled on a radical approach: They removed some of his immune cells, engineered them into cancer assassins and unleashed them into his bloodstream. Immune therapy is the hottest trend in...
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In this photo taken March 29, 2017, Dr. David Maloney of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is greeted by patient Ken Shefveland, whose lymphoma was successfully treated with CAR-T cell therapy. Immune therapy is the hottest trend in cancer care and its next frontier is creating "living drugs" that grow inside the body into an army that seeks and destroys tumors. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
June 12, 2017 - 5:05 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Ken Shefveland's body was swollen with cancer, treatment after treatment failing until doctors gambled on a radical approach: They removed some of his immune cells, engineered them into cancer assassins and unleashed them into his bloodstream. Immune therapy is the hottest trend in...
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FILE - In this Thursday, July 24, 2008 file photo, obese patients wash their plates after lunch at the Aimin Fat Reduction Hospital in Tianjin, China. The hospital uses a combination of diet, exercise and traditional Chinese acupuncture to treat rising obesity rates. Research released Monday, June 12, 2017 found the obesity epidemic is getting worse in most parts of the world, according to data between 1980 and 2015. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
June 12, 2017 - 1:55 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The global obesity problem now affects 1 in 10 people in the world, it is rising in countries rich and poor, and in many countries it is increasing faster in children than adults, according to a new study. The researchers estimated more than 107 million children and 603 million...
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FILE - In this Thursday, July 24, 2008 file photo, obese patients wash their plates after lunch at the Aimin Fat Reduction Hospital in Tianjin, China. The hospital uses a combination of diet, exercise and traditional Chinese acupuncture to treat rising obesity rates. Research released Monday, June 12, 2017 found the obesity epidemic is getting worse in most parts of the world, according to data between 1980 and 2015. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
June 12, 2017 - 12:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The global obesity problem now affects 1 in 10 people in the world, it is rising in countries rich and poor, and in many countries it is increasing faster in children than adults, according to a new study. The researchers estimated more than 107 million children and 603 million...
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