Lou Gehrig's disease

FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2013, file photo, O.J. Brigance, front, attends a celebration in Baltimore of the NFL football team's Super Bowl victory. Brigance will hold a celebration Tuesday, May 16, on the 10th anniversary of a day that forever changed his life. On May 16, 2007, the former Ravens linebacker learned he was afflicted with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. There is no known cure for what is commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, and the life expectancy after being diagnosed is usually two to five years. Only 10 percent of those with ALS live 10 years beyond the diagnosis, which explains why Brigance and his wife, Chanda, intend to savor the moment. Brigance serves as senior adviser to player engagement for the Ravens, a job he started in 2004. In addition to assisting players in each phase of their career, Brigance is a source of motivation. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)
May 15, 2017 - 1:07 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — O.J. Brigance will hold a celebration Tuesday on the 10th anniversary of a day that forever changed his life. On May 16, 2007, the former Baltimore Ravens linebacker learned he had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. There is no known cure for the motor neuron disease commonly...
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