Government surveillance

FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2017, file photo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. The Trump administration is urging Congress to reauthorize an intelligence surveillance law set to expire at the end of the year. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Coats wrote a letter Sept. 11, 2017, to top Republicans and Democrats in Congress, asking them to not only reauthorize it as it’s written, but make it a permanent fixture in the law books. (AP Andrew Harnik, File)
September 11, 2017 - 6:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is urging Congress to reauthorize an intelligence surveillance law set to expire at the end of the year. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and National Intelligence Director Dan Coats wrote a letter Monday to top Republicans and Democrats in Congress, asking...
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August 09, 2017 - 7:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A low-flying Russian airplane created a buzz in the nation's capital on Wednesday, but it turns out the surveillance flight over the Capitol, Pentagon and other sites was cleared by the U.S. government under a long-standing global treaty. The flight, which was filmed by The...
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FILE - In this Tuesday Nov. 4, 2008 file photo, Robert Hannigan, right, then security adviser to British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, and British Ambassador to the Philippines Peter Beckingham, left, talks to the media outside a hotel in Makati city, Philippines. A former British spy chief says parents should let kids spend more time online so they will learn vital cyber-skills, a reversal of common parenting advice. Robert Hannigan, ex-head of electronic surveillance agency GCHQ, challenges "the assumption that time online or in front of a screen is life wasted." Writing in the Daily Telegraph on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, he says "we need young people to explore this digital world just as they explore the physical world." (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, file)
August 08, 2017 - 11:17 am
LONDON (AP) — A former British spy chief says parents should let kids spend more time online so they will learn vital cyber-skills, countering the conventional parenting advice. Robert Hannigan, ex-director of government electronic surveillance agency GCHQ, challenges "the assumption that time...
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July 17, 2017 - 9:57 am
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya's government is "unlikely" to shut down the internet during next month's presidential elections but some social media might be shut down as needed, government officials said Monday. Communication Authority of Kenya chief Francis Wangusi said they are not thinking of...
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U.S. Customs and Border Protection supervisor Erik Gordon, left, helps passenger Ronan Pabhye navigate one of the new facial recognition kiosks at a United Airlines gate before boarding a flight to Tokyo, Wednesday, July 12, 2017, at George Bush Intercontinental Airport, in Houston. The Trump administration intends to require that American citizens boarding international flights submit to face scans, something Congress has not explicitly approved and privacy advocates consider an ill-advised step toward a surveillance state. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 12, 2017 - 6:45 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — If the Trump administration gets its way, U.S. citizens boarding international flights will have to submit to a face scan, a plan privacy advocates call a step toward a surveillance state. The Department of Homeland Security says it's the only way to successfully expand a program...
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July 05, 2017 - 1:01 pm
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The Kenyan government is rushing to set up systems to increase cybersecurity, but it may also be using the opportunity to increase surveillance as the country prepares for presidential elections next month, an international group promoting the right to privacy said Wednesday...
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FILE - This July 3, 2014, file photo, shows the Microsoft Corp. logo outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. On the surface, the investigation was routine. Federal agents persuaded a judge to issue a warrant for a Microsoft email account they suspected was used for drug trafficking. But U.S.-based Microsoft kept the emails on a server in Ireland. Microsoft said that meant they were beyond the warrant’s reach and a federal appeals court agreed. In June 2017, the Trump Administration asked the Supreme Court to intervene. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren, File)
July 03, 2017 - 3:23 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the surface, the investigation was routine. Federal agents persuaded a judge to issue a warrant for a Microsoft email account they suspected was used for drug trafficking. But U.S.-based Microsoft kept the emails on a server in Ireland. Microsoft said that meant the emails were...
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FILE - This July 3, 2014, file photo, shows the Microsoft Corp. logo outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. On the surface, the investigation was routine. Federal agents persuaded a judge to issue a warrant for a Microsoft email account they suspected was used for drug trafficking. But U.S.-based Microsoft kept the emails on a server in Ireland. Microsoft said that meant they were beyond the warrant’s reach and a federal appeals court agreed. In June 2017, the Trump Administration asked the Supreme Court to intervene. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren, File)
July 02, 2017 - 8:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the surface, the investigation was routine. Federal agents persuaded a judge to issue a warrant for a Microsoft email account they suspected was used for drug trafficking. But U.S.-based Microsoft kept the emails on a server in Ireland. Microsoft said that meant the emails were...
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In this June 22, 2017 photo, Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., chairman of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism is shown at the Capitol in Washington. Graham says he has reason to believe that a conversation he had with a foreigner was intercepted and that someone asked for his name to be unmasked. An intelligence official told Graham at a congressional hearing on Tuesday that his request is still being processed. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 27, 2017 - 4:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A key GOP senator weighing the pros and cons of U.S. foreign surveillance had the same question Tuesday as many Americans: Does the U.S. government sweep up their communications while monitoring targets abroad? Sen. Lindsey Graham didn't get an answer. The South Carolina...
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In this May 17, 2016, photo, Farhad Azima, the owner, chairman and chief executive officer of Kansas City-based Aviation Leasing Group poses for a photo at his home in Kansas City, Mo. The Associated Press has learned that the Iranian-born aviation mogul, described as holding a stay-out-of-jail card over his past work for the CIA, is the focus of a new global criminal corruption case. Authorities in the U.S. and abroad are investigating Azima as part of a global corruption case. Investigators are examining whether Azima, now 75, paid a kickback to a former United Arab Emirates official to reap the profits from a hotel sale in Tbilisi, Georgia. (Jill Toyoshiba/The Kansas City Star via AP)
June 21, 2017 - 2:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — When a Kansas strip-mall bank with possible mob ties folded in the mid-1980s, federal authorities investigated whether a shareholder, Iranian-born aviation magnate Farhad Azima, should face criminal charges. The probe hit a dead end. Azima, a U.S. citizen, essentially had a stay-...
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