Government appointments and nominations

FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., is interviewed on Capitol Hill in Washington. In Washington, Lance is often overlooked. But the gray-haired Republican in deep-blue New Jersey may become a crucial moderate vote in the fight to enact Trump’s agenda. And his ability to navigate the confused politics of the Trump era will help decide the House majority next year. Back in his suburban New Jersey district this week, he raised concerns about the Republican president’s plans for immigration, taxes and health care.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
September 25, 2017 - 5:12 am
WESTFIELD, N.J. (AP) — This is not President Donald Trump's dinner party. Republican Rep. Leonard Lance, standing in the middle of Ferraro's dimly lit restaurant dining room, says it's not necessary to build a wall along the entire U.S. border with Mexico. He raises concerns about the White House's...
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FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump meets with members of the Congressional Black Caucus in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. On the campaign trail last year, then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump sought the support of black voters by asking them, “What the hell do you have to lose?” An answer came during the Congressional Black Caucus’ annual legislative conference this past week: Everything. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
September 24, 2017 - 3:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the campaign trail last year, then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump sought the support of black voters by asking them, "What the hell do you have to lose?" An answer came during the Congressional Black Caucus' annual legislative conference this past week: Everything...
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President Donald Trump, second from left, greets U.S. Senate candidate Luther Strange after speaking at a campaign rally, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 24, 2017 - 11:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House suggests it won't be a defeat if President Donald Trump's candidate ends up losing Alabama's Senate GOP runoff. Legislative director Marc Short says Trump still supports Luther Strange, the establishment-backed candidate appointed to the seat that belonged to...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., is interviewed on Capitol Hill in Washington. In Washington, Lance is often overlooked. But the gray-haired Republican in deep-blue New Jersey may become a crucial moderate vote in the fight to enact Trump’s agenda. And his ability to navigate the confused politics of the Trump era will help decide the House majority next year. Back in his suburban New Jersey district this week, he raised concerns about the Republican president’s plans for immigration, taxes and health care.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
September 24, 2017 - 8:11 am
WESTFIELD, N.J. (AP) — This is not President Donald Trump's dinner party. Republican Rep. Leonard Lance, standing in the middle of Ferraro's dimly lit restaurant dining room, says it's not necessary to build a wall along the entire U.S. border with Mexico. He raises concerns about the White House's...
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President Donald Trump, center, greets U.S. Senate candidate Luther Strange after speaking at a campaign rally, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 23, 2017 - 6:42 am
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — President Donald Trump tried to convince Alabama conservatives that the establishment choice in a Republican runoff for Senate shares their revulsion of Washington politics, contending that Sen. Luther Strange is a "swamp" fighter without close ties to GOP leaders. Before...
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September 21, 2017 - 3:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A group of Obama administration officials is starting a legal aid organization to challenge the Trump administration's policies on student lending and civil rights. The National Student Legal Defense Network says it will join with state attorneys general and advocacy groups to sue...
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FILE - In this June 21, 2017 file photo, special counsel Robert Mueller departs after a closed-door meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee about Russian meddling in the election and possible connection to the Trump campaign, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump’s oldest son, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
September 21, 2017 - 1:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump's oldest son, The...
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FILE - In this June 21, 2017 file photo, special counsel Robert Mueller departs after a closed-door meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee about Russian meddling in the election and possible connection to the Trump campaign, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump’s oldest son, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
September 20, 2017 - 7:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller's team of investigators is seeking information from the White House related to Michael Flynn's stint as national security adviser and about the response to a meeting with a Russian lawyer that was attended by President Donald Trump's oldest son, The...
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September 19, 2017 - 9:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to oversee chemical safety at the Environmental Protection Agency has for years accepted payments for criticizing studies that raised concerns about the safety of his clients' products, according to a review of financial records and his published...
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September 19, 2017 - 9:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to oversee chemical safety at the Environmental Protection Agency has for years accepted payments for criticizing studies that raised concerns about the safety of his clients' products, according to a review of financial records and his published...
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