Government appointments and nominations

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a ceremony to unveil artifacts from the World Trade Center and Berlin Wall for the new NATO headquarters, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Brussels. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
May 25, 2017 - 5:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's revised travel ban "speaks with vague words of national security, but in context drips with religious intolerance, animus and discrimination," a federal appeals court said Thursday in ruling against the executive order targeting six Muslim-majority...
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NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a ceremony to unveil artifacts from the World Trade Center and Berlin Wall for the new NATO headquarters, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Brussels. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
May 25, 2017 - 5:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's revised travel ban "speaks with vague words of national security, but in context drips with religious intolerance, animus and discrimination," a federal appeals court said Thursday in ruling against the executive order targeting six Muslim-majority...
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May 24, 2017 - 4:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal appeals judges are divided as they hear arguments over whether the president should be able to more easily fire the head of the government's consumer finance watchdog agency. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, in a rare hearing Wednesday by all its...
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FILE - In this March 19, 1974 file photo, President Richard Nixon pounds his fist during a news conference in Houston, Texas. In Watergate, the smoking gun was a White House tape proving that Richard M. Nixon ordered a cover-up, the final evidence that forced him from the White House. In the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election campaign, the smoke hasn’t cleared because President Donald Trump keeps shooting. (AP Photo, File)
May 23, 2017 - 4:53 am
In Watergate, the smoking gun was a White House tape proving that Richard M. Nixon ordered a cover-up — the final evidence that forced him from the White House. In the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election campaign, the smoke hasn't cleared because President Donald...
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In this photo taken Feb. 10, 2017, then-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn sits in the front row in the East Room of the White House, in Washington. Attorneys for Flynn say that a daily "escalating public frenzy against him" and the Justice Department's appointment of a special counsel has created a legally dangerous environment for him to cooperate with a Senate investigation. That's according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press sent Monday by Flynn's legal team to the Senate Intelligence committee. It lays out the case for Flynn, the former national security adviser, to invoke his right against self-incrimination. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
May 22, 2017 - 6:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in rebuffing a subpoena Monday in the investigation into Russia's election meddling. Then a top House Democrat cited new evidence he said appeared...
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FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2017 file photo, Mike Flynn arrives for a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington. The former national security adviser will invoke his Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination on Monday, May 22, 2017, as he notifies the Senate Intelligence committee that he will not comply with a subpoena seeking documents. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
May 22, 2017 - 3:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, invoked his constitutional right against self-incrimination on Monday and declined to hand over documents sought under subpoena by a Senate panel investigating Russia's meddling in the 2016 election. In a...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017 file photo, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., questions Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen as she testifies in front of the Senate Banking Committee in Washington. Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton was meeting Friday, May 19, 2017 with Republican activists in the early presidential testing ground of Iowa, walking a delicate path by raising his national political profile at a time of turmoil for Donald Trump's White House. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 20, 2017 - 7:49 am
COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (AP) — Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton declared Americans "ready for that new beginning" in Iowa Friday, walking a delicate path by raising his national political profile at a time of turmoil for Donald Trump's White House. The 40-year-old freshman Republican senator sounded national...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017 file photo, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., questions Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen as she testifies in front of the Senate Banking Committee in Washington. Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton was meeting Friday, May 19, 2017 with Republican activists in the early presidential testing ground of Iowa, walking a delicate path by raising his national political profile at a time of turmoil for Donald Trump's White House. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 19, 2017 - 11:16 pm
COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (AP) — Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton met Friday with Republican activists in the early presidential testing ground of Iowa, walking a delicate path by raising his national political profile at a time of turmoil for Donald Trump's White House. The 40-year-old freshman Republican...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
May 19, 2017 - 3:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — If President Donald Trump was hoping to head out on his first big foreign trip with turmoil calmed at home, he's going to have a disappointing Air Force One departure on Friday. Combative and complaining, Trump fell short Thursday in trying to resolve investigations into his...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
May 18, 2017 - 7:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Brimming with resentment, President Donald Trump fervently denied on Thursday that his campaign had collaborated with Russia or that he'd tried to kill an FBI probe of the issue, contending that "even my enemies" recognize his innocence and declaring himself the most unfairly...
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