Diagnosis and treatment

FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2017, file photo, Missouri's Michael Porter Jr. warms up before the start of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa State, in Columbia, Mo. Michael Porter Jr. will miss the remainder of the season after undergoing lower back surgery, the school has announced. The 6-foot-10 Porter, the top prep prospect in the country last season, played in only two minutes of the Tigers’ season-opening win over Iowa State before missing the last three games with the injury. He will undergo surgery on Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017, in Dallas, and his expected recovery time is three to four months.(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
November 21, 2017 - 4:35 pm
COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Michael Porter Jr. insisted before the season that he was not necessarily a one-and-done player who would leave next year for the riches of the NBA. The standout Missouri freshman will have plenty of downtime to consider his future after the school announced Tuesday that he...
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In this Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, photo, Brad Sippy, chief executive officer of Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., stands for a portrait in Cambridge, Mass. Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a small startup trying to bring the recalled painkiller Vioxx back to the market. They are seeking FDA approval for patients with hemophilia with severe pain, but once on the market, doctors could go back to prescribing it to anyone with pain. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
November 21, 2017 - 11:02 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Could there be a second life for the once-popular arthritis pill Vioxx? A startup pharmaceutical company hopes so. Merck & Co. voluntarily pulled the blockbuster drug in 2004 amid evidence that it doubled the chances of having a heart attack or stroke. Now tiny Tremeau...
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FILE - This Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, file photo shows the New York Stock Exchange. U.S. stocks are opening slightly higher, Monday, Nov. 20, 2017, as technology companies and retailers make gains.(AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
November 20, 2017 - 2:27 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are higher Monday as technology and industrial companies, banks and retailers all make modest gains. Drugmakers and other health care companies are trading lower. Companies that make opioid pain medications are down sharply after the government released a much higher...
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Kyle Graves, who is in recovery for opioid addition, sits in the home he shares with his mother in Franklin, Tenn., Tuesday, June 6, 2017. Graves' troubles began more than a decade ago when he sought relief for degenerative arthritis in his hips, shoulders, feet and back. He was prescribed oxycodone, an opioid drug that works best for short-term pain but is risky and potentially addictive when used long-term. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
November 20, 2017 - 10:46 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — It's hard to say whether businessman Kyle Graves hit rock bottom when he shot himself in the ankle so emergency room doctors would feed his opioid habit or when he broke into a safe to steal his father's cancer pain medicine. For straight-talking ex-trucker Jeff McCoy, it...
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FILE - in this Nov. 15, 2017, photo, medical doctor Lee Cook-jong describes the parasites found inside the body of a North Korean soldier at Ajou University Medical Center in Suwon, South Korea. Hospital officials say on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, the condition of the North Korean soldier severely wounded by gunfire while escaping to South Korea is gradually improving after two surgeries but it's too early to tell whether he makes a recovery.(Kim In-chul/Yonhap via AP, File)
November 18, 2017 - 7:36 pm
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Surgeons treating a North Korean soldier who was severely wounded by gunfire while escaping to South Korea have removed dozens of parasites from his body, including presumed roundworms as long as 27 centimeters (11 inches), hospital officials said. The soldier, whose name...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo Rev. Jesse Jackson speaks during a news conference in Chicago. Rev. Jackson says he's been seeking outpatient care for two years for Parkinson's disease and plans to "dedicate" himself to physical therapy. In a Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 letter to supporters, the 76-year-old says family and friends noticed a change in him about three years ago and he could no longer ignore symptoms. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green File)
November 17, 2017 - 9:25 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The Rev. Jesse Jackson disclosed publicly Friday that he has been seeking outpatient care for two years for Parkinson's disease and plans to "dedicate" himself to physical therapy to slow the progress of the disease. In a letter to supporters, the 76-year-old civil rights icon said...
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November 17, 2017 - 2:44 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A university student's therapy dog has been allowed to stay in an Ohio sorority house until the courts sort out whether it needs to move because of another student's allergies. A federal judge's ruling issued Friday blocks Ohio State University from ordering the dog out of the...
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This photo provided by Genentech, Inc. shows a package of the drug Hemlibra. On Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration approved Hemlibra, the first new treatment in nearly two decades to prevent internal bleeding in certain patients with hemophilia, an inherited blood-clotting disorder. (Genentech, Inc. via AP)
November 16, 2017 - 6:07 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators have approved the first new treatment in nearly two decades to prevent internal bleeding in certain patients with hemophilia. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved Hemlibra, a weekly self-injection for hemophilia A patients who have developed...
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FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2014 file photo, a doctor injects a patient with a solution he says is rich in adult stem cells, at his practice in Beverly Hills, Calif. On Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration laid out a strategy for regulating cell-based medicine, amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that has received little oversight. (AP Photo/Raquel Maria Dillon)
November 16, 2017 - 4:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities announced plans Thursday to crack down on doctors pushing stem cell procedures that pose the gravest risks to patients amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that previously has received little oversight. The Food and Drug Administration laid...
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