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President Donald Trump speaks to reporters upon his return to the White House in Washington, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. Citizens of eight countries will face new restrictions on entry to the U.S. under a proclamation signed by Trump on Sunday. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
September 24, 2017 - 10:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Citizens of more than half a dozen countries will face new restrictions on entry to the U.S. under a proclamation signed by President Donald Trump on Sunday that will replace his expiring travel ban. The new rules, which will impact the citizens of Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea,...
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President Donald Trump speaks to reporters upon his return to the White House in Washington, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. Citizens of eight countries will face new restrictions on entry to the U.S. under a proclamation signed by Trump on Sunday. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
September 24, 2017 - 10:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Citizens of more than half a dozen countries will face new restrictions on entry to the U.S. under a proclamation signed by President Donald Trump on Sunday that will replace his expiring travel ban. The new rules, which will impact the citizens of Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea,...
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State Rep. Bruce Franks chants in front of the Buzz Westfall Justice Center as more than a hundred people wait for the release of almost two dozen people arrested earlier in the day at the Saint Louis Galleria mall, Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017, in Clayton, Mo. Demonstrations have been ongoing after a judge's ruling on Sept. 15 that found white former police officer Jason Stockley not guilty of first-degree murder in the 2011 shooting death of a 24-year-old black drug suspect Anthony Lamar Smith. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
September 24, 2017 - 5:14 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Latest on protests following the acquittal of a former police officer in the death of a black man in St. Louis. (all times local): 4:45 p.m. Several protesters gather outside the St. Louis County Justice Center to show support for 22 people arrested at an upscale shopping mall...
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FILE - In this Sept. 25, 1957, file photo, nine African American students enter Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., escorted by troops of the 101st Airborne Division. (AP Photo/File)
September 24, 2017 - 2:31 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Among the most lasting and indelible images of the civil rights movement were the nine black teenagers who had to be escorted by federal troops past an angry white mob and through the doors of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, on Sept. 25, 1957. It had been...
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In this Sept. 21, 2017, photo, Lonnie Bunch, director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, talks about the museum's first year and his vision for the future of the exhibits, in Washington. The museum is celebrating its first birthday just as popular as it was on its opening day (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
September 23, 2017 - 11:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In its first year, the Smithsonian's new black museum has become the nation's top temple to blackness, an Afrocentric shrine on the National Mall where people of all races, colors and creed are flocking to experience — and leave behind for posterity — the highs and lows of African...
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This undated photo provided by Georgia Department of Corrections shows Keith Leroy Tharpe. Georgia is preparing to put to death Tharpe, who killed his sister-in-law 27 years ago. But his lawyers say the execution should be stopped because his death sentence is tainted by a juror’s racial bias. Lawyers for the state dispute that and say 59-year-old Tharpe should die as scheduled on Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017. Tharpe was convicted in the Sept. 25, 1990 shooting death of his sister-in-law, Jaquelyn Freeman. ( Georgia Department of Corrections via AP)
September 23, 2017 - 11:20 am
ATLANTA (AP) — As Georgia prepares to put to death a man who killed his sister-in-law 27 years ago, his lawyers say the execution should be stopped because his death sentence is tainted by a juror's racial bias. Lawyers for the state reject that argument and say Keith Leroy Tharpe, 59, should die...
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President Donald Trump gestures as he walks to board Air Force One to travel to Huntsville, Ala., for a campaign rally for Senate candidate Luther Strange, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 23, 2017 - 7:51 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next version of President Donald Trump's travel ban could include new, more tailored restrictions on travelers from additional countries. The Department of Homeland Security has recommended the president impose the new, targeted restrictions on foreign nationals from countries...
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President Donald Trump gestures as he walks to board Air Force One to travel to Huntsville, Ala., for a campaign rally for Senate candidate Luther Strange, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 23, 2017 - 7:51 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next version of President Donald Trump's travel ban could include new, more tailored restrictions on travelers from additional countries. The Department of Homeland Security has recommended the president impose the new, targeted restrictions on foreign nationals from countries...
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President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 22, 2017 - 8:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is weighing the next iteration of his controversial travel ban, which could include new, more tailored restrictions on travelers from additional countries. The Department of Homeland Security has recommended the president impose the new, targeted...
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Demonstrators march outside federal court in New Orleans, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. With immigrants and their advocates chanting and beating drums outside, a federal appeals court heard arguments Friday on whether it should allow a Texas law aimed at combatting "sanctuary cities" to immediately take effect. (AP Photo/Stacey Plaisance Jenkins)
September 22, 2017 - 7:01 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — With immigrants and their advocates chanting and beating drums outside, a federal appeals court heard arguments Friday on whether it should allow a Texas law aimed at combatting "sanctuary cities" to immediately take effect. Under the law, Texas police chiefs could face removal...
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