Campaign spending

FILE - In a Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 file photo, Steve Bannon, left, introduces U.S. senatorial candidate Roy Moore, right, during a campaign rally, in Fairhope, Ala. Dogged by allegations of sexual misconduct, Moore has kept to events with limited publicity and shunned contact with the traditional media in the heated race for U.S. Senate. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)
December 11, 2017 - 1:50 am
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been a rare sight on the traditional campaign trail in the days ahead of a critical U.S. Senate race. He's appeared at only a handful of rallies in front of friendly audiences and steadfastly has shunned reporters from the...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 file photo, former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally, in Dora, Ala. Federal fundraising reports released Friday, Dec. 1, reveal that Moore is losing the battle for campaign cash to Democrat Doug Jones. And he's losing badly. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)
December 02, 2017 - 3:04 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Alabama Republican Roy Moore has celebrated his isolated fight against the political establishment in both parties. The outsider story may resonate with Alabama voters, but the reality has a clear downside: The Senate candidate and his allies are almost completely cut off from the...
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November 07, 2017 - 7:55 pm
Some of the nation's biggest political donors, including some who spent $60 million supporting Republican Donald Trump last year, are among those who took advantage of offshore tax loopholes, according to leaked corporate documents made public Tuesday. The documents also name a top donor and former...
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In this Oct. 30, 2017, photo, Rick Gates leaves federal court in Washington, Monday, Oct. 30, 2017. Inside Trump Tower, some knew Gates as “the walking dead.” He had somehow survived the ouster of his closest campaign ally, chairman Paul Manafort, and Donald Trump himself had ordered Gates off the campaign more than once. Yet Gates, Manafort’s longtime deputy, maintained a significant role in Trump’s presidential campaign. He went on to manage Trump’s $107-million inauguration fund. And he would soon become a regular visitor to the White House.(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
November 02, 2017 - 4:51 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside Trump Tower, some knew Rick Gates as "the walking dead." He had somehow survived the ouster of his closest campaign ally, chairman Paul Manafort, and Donald Trump himself had ordered Gates off the campaign more than once. Yet Gates, Manafort's longtime deputy, maintained a...
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FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2017 photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with Governor Ricardo Rossello of Puerto Rico in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Trump intends to spend at least $430,000 of his own money to help pay the legal bills of White House staff and campaign aides related to the investigations into Russian election meddling in the 2016 election. A White House official confirmed the plan, which was first reported by the website Axios. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
October 21, 2017 - 9:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump intends to spend at least $430,000 of his own money to help pay the legal bills of White House staff and campaign aides related to the investigations into Russian election meddling in the 2016 election, a White House official said Saturday. It's the first...
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October 16, 2017 - 6:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's re-election campaign spent more than $1 million in legal fees in the last three months, coinciding with a spike in intensity from Russia investigators. The spending on lawyers is detailed in the latest campaign finance disclosure by the president's re-...
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September 13, 2017 - 4:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has selected a Texas attorney and supporter to join the beleaguered Federal Election Commission. Trump appointed James "Trey" Trainor III, a well-known election-law specialist based in Austin, to the panel that monitors and polices federal campaign...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks after a closed meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. Hundreds of fake Facebook accounts, probably run from Russia, spent about $100,000 on ads aimed at stirring up divisive issues such as gun control and race relations during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the social network said Sept. 6, 2017. Schiff said Facebook’s disclosure confirmed what many lawmakers investigating Russian interference in the U.S. election had long suspected. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
September 07, 2017 - 3:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of fake Facebook accounts, probably run from Russia, spent about $100,000 on ads aimed at stirring up divisive issues such as gun control and race relations during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the social network said Wednesday. Although the number of ads is...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks after a closed meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. Hundreds of fake Facebook accounts, probably run from Russia, spent about $100,000 on ads aimed at stirring up divisive issues such as gun control and race relations during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the social network said Sept. 6, 2017. Schiff said Facebook’s disclosure confirmed what many lawmakers investigating Russian interference in the U.S. election had long suspected. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
September 06, 2017 - 8:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of fake Facebook accounts, probably run from Russia, spent about $100,000 on ads aimed at stirring up divisive issues such as gun control and race relations during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the social network said Wednesday. Although the number of ads is...
Read More
FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks after a closed meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. Hundreds of fake Facebook accounts, probably run from Russia, spent about $100,000 on ads aimed at stirring up divisive issues such as gun control and race relations during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the social network said Sept. 6, 2017. Schiff said Facebook’s disclosure confirmed what many lawmakers investigating Russian interference in the U.S. election had long suspected. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
September 06, 2017 - 6:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of fake Facebook accounts, probably run from Russia, spent about $100,000 on ads aimed at stirring up divisive issues such as gun control and race relations during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the social network said Wednesday. Although the number of ads is...
Read More

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