Technology

FILE- In this Dec. 13, 2016, file photo, Anthony Levandowski, head of Uber's self-driving program, speaks about their driverless car in San Francisco. In an order filed Monday, May 15, 2017, a federal judge ordered Uber to stop using technology that Levandowski downloaded before he left Waymo, the Alphabet Inc. autonomous car arm that was spun off from Google. The order filed Monday in a trade secrets theft lawsuit also forces Uber to return all downloaded materials. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
May 15, 2017 - 11:07 am
DETROIT (AP) — A federal judge has ordered Uber to stop using technology that a key executive downloaded before he left Waymo, the autonomous car company that was spun off from Google. The order filed Monday in a trade secrets theft lawsuit also forces Uber to return all downloaded materials by...
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May 15, 2017 - 9:34 am
WILMOT, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire man who was injured in a house explosion is thanking Siri for saving his life. Christopher Beaucher says he was checking on his mother's vacant cottage in Wilmot on May 1 when he saw something suspicious and went inside. He tells WMUR-TV ( http://bit.ly/2pNoixW...
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FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 9:09 am
LONDON (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack spread to thousands more computers on Monday as people across Asia logged in at work, disrupting businesses, schools, hospitals and daily life. But no new large-scale outbreaks were reported, and British officials said a feared second wave of...
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FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 8:53 am
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 1:50 p.m. Germany's interior ministry says software companies need to do their own homework, rather than blame governments for security breaches. Microsoft's top lawyer, Brad Smith, had...
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FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 8:53 am
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 1:50 p.m. Germany's interior ministry says software companies need to do their own homework, rather than blame governments for security breaches. Microsoft's top lawyer, Brad Smith, had...
Read More
FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 7:39 am
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 12:40 p.m. Tom Bossert, a homeland security adviser to U.S. President Donald Trump, says the recent global cyberattack is something that "for right now, we've got under control" in the...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 7:10 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack spread to thousands of more computers on Monday as people logged in at work, disrupting business, schools, hospitals and daily life, though no new large-scale breakdowns were reported. In Britain, whose health service was among the first high-...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 6:35 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack spread to thousands of more computers on Monday as people logged in at work, disrupting business, schools, hospitals and daily life, though no new large-scale breakdowns were reported. In Britain, whose health service was among the first high-...
Read More
FILE - In this May 13, 2017, file photo, a screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack, as captured by a computer user in Taiwan, is seen on a laptop in Beijing. As danger from the global cyberattack continues to fade, analysts are starting to assess the damage. The good news: Hard-hit organizations such as the U.K.’s National Health Service appear to be bouncing back, and few people seem to have actually paid the ransom. The bad: This attack has demonstrated how a new automated form of malware can spread rapidly, potentially encouraging future hackers. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
May 15, 2017 - 5:58 am
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 10:55 a.m. Indian authorities were on high alert for news of malfunctioning computers Monday, after experts estimated 5 percent of affected computers were in the country. The Computer...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 5:01 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack wreaked havoc in hospitals, schools and offices across the globe on Monday. Asia reported thousands of new cases but no large-scale breakdowns as workers started the week by booting up their computers. The full extent of the damage from the...
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