Health

In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, photo, Dawn Erin poses for a photo at her home, in Austin, Texas. Erin was among more than 20 million Americans who gained coverage under Affordable Care Act. The health law helped push uninsured rates to historic lows and also aimed to bring the newly insured back into the primary care system to improve their health. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
May 28, 2017 - 10:43 am
Dawn Erin went nearly 20 years without health insurance before the Affordable Care Act, bouncing between free clinics for frequent and painful bladder infections. The liver-destroying disease hepatitis C made her ineligible for coverage until President Barack Obama's law barred insurers from...
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In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, photo, Dawn Erin poses for a photo at her home, in Austin, Texas. Erin was among more than 20 million Americans who gained coverage under Affordable Care Act. The health law helped push uninsured rates to historic lows and also aimed to bring the newly insured back into the primary care system to improve their health. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
May 28, 2017 - 10:43 am
Dawn Erin went nearly 20 years without health insurance before the Affordable Care Act, bouncing between free clinics for frequent and painful bladder infections. The liver-destroying disease hepatitis C made her ineligible for coverage until President Barack Obama's law barred insurers from...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito known to carry the Zika virus, is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. India has reported three cases of the Zika virus for the first time, including two pregnant women who delivered healthy babies. The World Health Organization said in a statement released Friday that the three cases that India reported to the WHO on May 15 were detected through routine blood surveillance in a hospital in Ahmadabad, Gujarat's capital. Two cases were detected in February and November last year, while a third case was detected in January this year. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
May 28, 2017 - 5:21 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India has reported its first three cases of the Zika virus, including two pregnant women who delivered healthy babies. Health Ministry officials said Sunday that the three patients in western Gujarat state had recovered. "There is no need to panic," Dr. Soumya Swaminathan, a top...
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FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito known to carry the Zika virus, is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. India has reported three cases of the Zika virus for the first time, including two pregnant women who delivered healthy babies. The World Health Organization said in a statement released Friday that the three cases that India reported to the WHO on May 15 were detected through routine blood surveillance in a hospital in Ahmadabad, Gujarat's capital. Two cases were detected in February and November last year, while a third case was detected in January this year. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
May 28, 2017 - 5:21 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India has reported its first three cases of the Zika virus, including two pregnant women who delivered healthy babies. Health Ministry officials said Sunday that the three patients in western Gujarat state had recovered. "There is no need to panic," Dr. Soumya Swaminathan, a top...
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May 28, 2017 - 3:42 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India has reported three cases of the Zika virus that occurred last year in western Gujarat state, including two pregnant women who delivered healthy babies. Health Ministry officials said Sunday that the three patients had recovered. "There is no need to panic," Dr. Soumya...
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May 28, 2017 - 3:42 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India has reported three cases of the Zika virus that occurred last year in western Gujarat state, including two pregnant women who delivered healthy babies. Health Ministry officials said Sunday that the three patients had recovered. "There is no need to panic," Dr. Soumya...
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FILE - In this Jan. 20, 2015 file photo, a plume of steam billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. Earth is likely to hit more dangerous levels of warming even sooner if the U.S. pulls back from its pledge to cut carbon dioxide pollution because America contributes so much to rising temperatures, scientists said. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
May 27, 2017 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is likely to reach more dangerous levels of warming even sooner if the U.S. retreats from its pledge to cut carbon dioxide pollution, scientists said. That's because America contributes so much to rising temperatures. President Donald Trump, who once proclaimed global...
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FILE - In this Jan. 20, 2015 file photo, a plume of steam billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. Earth is likely to hit more dangerous levels of warming even sooner if the U.S. pulls back from its pledge to cut carbon dioxide pollution because America contributes so much to rising temperatures, scientists said. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
May 27, 2017 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is likely to reach more dangerous levels of warming even sooner if the U.S. retreats from its pledge to cut carbon dioxide pollution, scientists said. That's because America contributes so much to rising temperatures. President Donald Trump, who once proclaimed global...
Read More
US President Donald Trump arrives arrives for a meeting of G7 leaders and Outreach partners at the Hotel San Domenico on the second day of a G7 summit, in Taormina, Italy, Saturday, May 27, 2017. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)
May 27, 2017 - 8:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is likely to reach more dangerous levels of warming even sooner if the U.S. retreats from its pledge to cut carbon dioxide pollution, scientists said. That's because America contributes so much to rising temperatures. President Donald Trump, who once proclaimed global...
Read More
US President Donald Trump arrives arrives for a meeting of G7 leaders and Outreach partners at the Hotel San Domenico on the second day of a G7 summit, in Taormina, Italy, Saturday, May 27, 2017. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)
May 27, 2017 - 8:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is likely to reach more dangerous levels of warming even sooner if the U.S. retreats from its pledge to cut carbon dioxide pollution, scientists said. That's because America contributes so much to rising temperatures. President Donald Trump, who once proclaimed global...
Read More

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